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Valentine’s Day Japanese Craft Fair/ Katagiri 59th

Katagiri Valentine's day Japanese craft fair

We are having our first craft fair at Japanese grocery store 'Katagiri 59th store'

We will have a Japanese handmade booth at the Japanese grocery store in Manhattan, ‘Katagiri.’ We will be featuring dried flowers, handmade accessories, and kimono bags. Don’t miss this opportunity; it will be a two-day event!

Please check their instagram.

 

📍 Location: 

224 E 59th St, New York, NY 10022(free administration )


📅 Date&⏰Time:

Feb 10th (Sat) 12PM-5PM

Feb 11th(Sun) 12PM-4PM

 

Meet our handmade artists!

fancy pop

Handmade jewelry for the everyday girl

Handmade cute jewelry and accessories including earrings, necklaces, bracelets, hair pins and more!
🎨 Resin & air dry clay

 
Sushi Earrings

Bead Factory Ever Green/ビーズ工房 Ever Green

Origami accessories (earrings & hair ornaments) you can use for both casual and formal occasions. One of a kind earrings, necklaces, rings with beads, pearls, and gemstones carefully crafted with love. She is a certified professor of “Jewelry Crochet” technique.

Origami earrings evergreen

水引装飾Twilight

“Mizuhiki” is a traditional Japanese paper string used for celebrations. It is used as a prayer decoration to wish for happiness.
Everyday, with the strength of a Japanese heart.
These Mizuhiki are made of light material so that it is easy to wear as an accessory.

mizuhiki twilight

ryuroru

Ryuroru creates accessories for all ages and all genders. The accessories are made with 925 silver.
The main concepts behind the brand are sea, space, and simple.
ryuroru

MEINFINITY

The fabrics have unique designs of such quality that you feel as if you are wearing Japanese artwork. These bags are for anyone who would like to have unique designs based on Japanese culture. By owning your own Japanese bag, you can always have a piece of Japanese culture with you.

Interview Article 

Instagram

Online Store

MEINFINITY Kimono Bag

Heartfish

Heartfish Press is a creative studio located in Brooklyn, NY, specializing in letterpress printing and floral design. The studio offers a variety of letterpress prints, cards, and custom design services that involve creating floral designs using dried flowers.

instagram

Website

 

Dried flower arrangement

If you missed the event, don’t worry! 

We have an online store where you can find Japanese special handmade items

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Japanese Food & Craft Fair/Tangram in Flushing

Japanese food and craft fair

Event details

Discover Japanese-Inspired food and craft show!

We’re thrilled to share that our collaboration with Resobox will showcase a delightful array of Japanese culinary treasures.

Explore a stunning collection of earrings, necklaces, and more, all with a touch of Japanese inspiration. Calling all Japanese artists and creators influenced by Japan to showcase their unique works! Join us to experience a showcase of diverse artistic talents.

Event Details:

📍 Location : Tangram

      133-33 39th Ave, Queens

📅 Date: Jan 20th(Sat)&21st (Sun)
⏰ Time: 12 PM – 7PM

Don’t miss this chance to immerse yourself in creativity and culture.

Tangram Mall Japanese craft and food fair

Meet our handmade artists!

JOGI NO YUME

JOGI NO YUME we take pride in curating handcrafted products, each imbued with the essence of Japan. Our dedication to quality and the use of authentic Japanese supplies ensure that every piece tells a unique story. We made every piece from our heart and hoping to bring along joy to all the New Yorker.

JOGI NO YUME
JOGI NO YUME

Riverside Wrapping Co.

Riverside Wrapping Co. offers high quality custom gift wrapping service and Mizuhiki (Japanese paper cords) accesories by certified Gift Wrapping Coordinator Emi, based in Upper West Side, NY.

Japanese Mizuhiki Earrings
mizuhiki artist

satokomatsu

Satoko founder of satokomatsu, a native of Osaka, was nurtured by a blend of influences including her parents, an English teacher, and a Japanese calligraphy instructor. Throughout her university years, where she delved into Italian language and culture, Arabic, and Hebrew studies, she embarked on a journey to Florence to explore the realm of jewelry design.

After accumulating eight years of experience as a jewelry designer in Japan, Satoko relocated to New York in 2013 to further refine her design prowess. It was in 2015 that she took the bold step of establishing her personal jewelry line, marking a significant milestone in her creative journey.

Dragon necklace designed with Arabic word. Not only is this necklace a beautiful jewelry, but it’s also a great tool to help you learn Arabic, and a conversation starter. 2024 is the Year of the Dragon, It’s the perfect gift for someone was born in this year.

 

Please check her interview article from here!

Dragon necklace designed with Arabic
satokomatsu

Kazaria3

Handmade hat and kimono used Japanese fabric

 

Kazaria3
Japanese Handmade Hat designer

Hiroko Yokotagawa

Potter in NYC
I’ll die with clay 🖤 土の中で眠りたい…love nature and explore 💚

 

Hiroko Yokotagawa
Hiroko Yokotagawa

We will have delightful Japanese treats like fresh fruit and grilled sweet potato

Ikigai Fruits

Behind every fruit, there’s a farmer with an Ikigai.

Ikigai Fruits

If you missed the event, don’t worry! 

We have an online store where you can find Japanese special handmade items

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Chelsea Market Pop-Up Shop Collaboration with 1 Common

Chelsea Market popup shop

About collaboration event

Exciting Collaboration Alert: Join us for our latest event with 1COMMON! Since 2012, 1COMMON, originally a pop-up shop in Chelsea Market, has been showcasing a thoughtfully curated array of fashion, culture, and lifestyle brands. Our collaboration aims to support brands in establishing their identity and creatively promoting their products.

1 common Chelsea market

Date and Location

📍 Location: : Chelsea Market

75 Ninth Avenue (between 15th & 16th St.) New York,

📅 Date : Dec 16th(Sat)-24th(Sun) 

⏰ Time:11AM-7PM

*Only 1/13(Sat) is 11AM-8PM

 

Chelsea market collaboration event with 1 Common

Featured Brands at the Event

niji Japanese handmade marketplace

Pucci Ropa Jewelry

Handmade starling silver/brass jewelry. Made with special tool that creates organic and abstract shape. Enjoy a unique jewelry and hidden massages.

Instagram

Interview article of pucci ropa jewelry

Pucci Ropa Jewelry
Japanese Jewelry designer

Lunaris

Hand crafted from start to finish. Lunaris Jewelry by NYC based Japanese designer Airi Nishiguchi captures the purity and effervescence of the moment you see a rainbow or a full moon. With dozens of designs available in Sterling Silver, Brass and 14k gold as well as comissioned pieces, you can bring a bit of charm and delight to your look.

Instagram 

 

Lunaris Japanese jewelry designer
Lunaris Japanese jewelry designer

MEINFINITY

The fabrics have unique designs of such quality that you feel as if you are wearing Japanese artwork. These bags are for anyone who would like to have unique designs based on Japanese culture. By owning your own Japanese bag, you can always have a piece of Japanese culture with you.

Interview Article 

Instagram

Online Store

Japanese kimono bag designer
Japanese kimono bag designer

Pompkins Baby by Nappel

Pop Up Sox are made by Japanese craftsmen using special knitting machines that create the 3-D animal ears and hands that pop out– babies love them and so do grown-ups!

They are ideal baby shower gifts. Pompkins Baby organic cotton products have a natural and gentle feel. They are made from cotton that is grown in soil not treated with pesticides or chemical fertilizers for more than three years– ladybugs are used instead of pesticides, and is harvested after the frost has ended when leaves fall off naturally.

Instagram

baby socks brand Nappel
baby socks Nappel

kazaria3

Handmade reversible bucket hat with Javanese fabric.

Instagram

Online Store

Japanese Handmade Hat designer
Kazaria 3

ryuroru

ryuroru creates accessories for all ages and all genders. The accessories are made with 925 silver.
The main concepts behind the brand are sea, space, and simple.
 
Ryuroru

Q:Lastly, could you share your outlook for the future?

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Valentine’s Day Japanese Crafts and Artisan Market / Feb 4th 2024

Valentine’s Day Japanese Crafts and Artisan Market
UPBEET!Tokyo
Japanese handmade makers market
Scrap Artisan
kazaria3

Event details

Discover Japanese-Inspired Accessories and Art at Our Craft Show!

Explore a stunning collection of earrings, necklaces, and more, all with a touch of Japanese inspiration. Calling all Japanese artists and creators influenced by Japan to showcase their unique works! Join us to experience a showcase of diverse artistic talents.

Event Details:

📍 Location: 91 E 3rd St, New York, NY 10003 *Indoor and free administration 
📅 Date: Feb 4th (Sunday)
⏰ Time: 2 PM – 6 PM

Don’t miss this chance to immerse yourself in creativity and culture!

Eventbrite 

Japanese handmade makers market
Japanese makers market

We will have a special tasting event! Japanese vegan and gluten-free donut from Tokyo will join our event.

UPBEET!Tokyo

In 2018, we launched a vegan and gluten-free donut shop in Tokyo, Japan. Since then, our presence has expanded nationwide in Japan, garnering attention for our products. What sets our products apart is the incorporation of traditional Japanese fermented ingredients like amazake, enabling the effective intake of probiotics in our donuts. We also emphasize the use of clean ingredients. Additionally, we’ve introduced ‘Mochi’ textured donuts to our range. We invite you to indulge in our unique and nutritious donuts, exclusively crafted from Japan.

 

Japanese Vegan Donut

Meet our handmade artists!

We are excited to introduce our talented Japanese artists at the event.

You’ll have the chance to meet the handmade creators in person, hear their stories, and learn about the intricate details behind each item. Discover truly unique and creative works for yourself or find the perfect gift for your loved ones.

Scrap Artisan

Scrap Artisan creates uniquely handcrafted items from recycled or reclaimed materials, such as teddy bears made from kimono fabric and bags made from obi sashes.

Yukiyo Nagata

Kazaria3

Handmade hat and kimono used Japanese fabric

 

IMG_20230809_184842_679
Kazaria 3

satokomatsu

Satoko founder of satokomatsu, a native of Osaka, was nurtured by a blend of influences including her parents, an English teacher, and a Japanese calligraphy instructor. Throughout her university years, where she delved into Italian language and culture, Arabic, and Hebrew studies, she embarked on a journey to Florence to explore the realm of jewelry design.

After accumulating eight years of experience as a jewelry designer in Japan, Satoko relocated to New York in 2013 to further refine her design prowess. It was in 2015 that she took the bold step of establishing her personal jewelry line, marking a significant milestone in her creative journey.

GRAPE pendant in Hiragana. Can you find the hidden ‘ぶどう’ in the cluster, a symbol of fertility and wealth? You can enjoy the beauty of language and culture with this ‘word picture’ style design. A thoughtful gift for wine lovers and Japanese enthusiasts.

Please check her interview article from here!

satokomatsu
Ume

Designed with beautiful curvy letters in Japanese うめ [oo-meh] means “plum blossom” in Japanese. Top part is including “う” and two petals at the bottom is designed with “め”. Using a word, design its shape so I call this style “word picture”. Very unique design concept. You can use this one as a conversation starter because the letters are well blended, nobody notices it’s letter until you explain. Then you can communicate with jewelry.

TeaLoveCrochet

TeaLoveCrochet expands on what we normally associate with knit and crochet. Creating cute accessories inspired by Asian food, Harajuku fashion, and their own Asian American culture.

 

TeaLoveCrochet
TeaLoveCrochet

Riverside Wrapping Co.

Riverside Wrapping Co. offers high quality custom gift wrapping service and Mizuhiki (Japanese paper cords) accesories by certified Gift Wrapping Coordinator Emi, based in Upper West Side, NY.

mizuhiki artist
Japanese Mizuhiki Earrings

JOGI NO YUME

JOGI NO YUME we take pride in curating handcrafted products, each imbued with the essence of Japan. Our dedication to quality and the use of authentic Japanese supplies ensure that every piece tells a unique story. We made every piece from our heart and hoping to bring along joy to all the New Yorker.

JOGI NO YUME
JOGI NO YUME

Pucci Ropa Jewelry

Handmade starling silver/brass jewelry. Made with special tool that creates organic and abstract shape. Enjoy a unique jewelry and hidden massages.

Instagram

Interview article of pucci ropa jewelry

Pucci Ropa Jewelry
Japanese silver jewelry designer

Pompkins Baby by Nappel

Pop Up Sox are made by Japanese craftsmen using special knitting machines that create the 3-D animal ears and hands that pop out– babies love them and so do grown-ups!

They are ideal baby shower gifts. Pompkins Baby organic cotton products have a natural and gentle feel. They are made from cotton that is grown in soil not treated with pesticides or chemical fertilizers for more than three years– ladybugs are used instead of pesticides, and is harvested after the frost has ended when leaves fall off naturally.

Instagram

baby socks Nappel
baby socks brand Nappel

MEINFINITY

The fabrics have unique designs of such quality that you feel as if you are wearing Japanese artwork. These bags are for anyone who would like to have unique designs based on Japanese culture. By owning your own Japanese bag, you can always have a piece of Japanese culture with you.

Interview Article 

Instagram

Online Store

Japanese kimono bag designer
MEINFINITY Kimono Bag

We will be offering Japanese sweets, snacks, and beverages at the event. Come join us and savor the delights of creativity and Japanese culture.

If you are not in NYC or can’t make it to join us for the pop-up events, please visit our online marketplace “niji“.

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An interview with ‘MEINFINITY,’ a brand by Akiko, celebrated for its exquisite handbags made from traditional Japanese materials. Akiko shares insights into her brand’s journey.

Kimono bag designer

This is an interview article with a handmade artist who expresses the desire to expand handmade creations from Japan to overseas. The NiJi e-commerce site features many talented artists who engage in creative activities with such aspirations. On this page, we delve deeper into the charm of affiliated artists and their works. In this inaugural interview, we speak with Akiko, the designer behind the brand 'MEINFINITY,' which specializes in bags made from traditional Japanese materials such as kimono and obi.

MEINFINITYinstagram

online store

Q: The beautiful traditional-patterned bags are modern and quite impressive. What inspired you to start creating bags from kimono and obi fabrics?

In recent years, even as a Japanese person, direct interaction with kimono in daily life has become quite rare. I was one of those who thought, “I’d like to wear it, but it takes time and money, and it’s high-end, so it seems inaccessible.” My turning point came when I casually stepped into a recycled kimono specialty store. At that moment, I took a kimono into my hands and examined it closely for the first time. Despite having no knowledge about kimonos, I was captivated by the item in my hands, thinking, “The pattern of these flowers is incredibly cute!” Being ignorant, I didn’t approach it from a traditional perspective but saw it as a unique design that instantly caught my eye. Holding a particularly liked obi, standing in front of the mirror, I intuitionally felt, “This could be a clutch bag,” and this newfound discovery brought me joy. Without hesitation, I purchased obis and haoris and started creating bags at home.

Q: Did you have any prior experience in sewing or crafting small items before, or was this your first venture into such creative work?

Actually, I had zero skills. The desire to “give it a try” drove me to start from scratch, from buying a domestic sewing machine. Both the sewing machine and kimonos were entirely new to me, so I worked on my projects while attending a kimono shop once a week. The women gathered at the shop would share tips like, “Since the fabric is thick, it’s better to use denim needles for the sewing machine,” and they provided various insights along with interesting anecdotes. Taking in their advice, I managed to shape things little by little.

Japanese kimono bag designer

Q: Your proactive approach is truly impressive. It began as a hobby, right? Could you share the journey from that hobby to eventually selling your creations?

For the birthday of an American friend living in San Francisco, I decided to make a bag as a gift. That was the very first thing I posted on Instagram. Initially, it was more of a record for myself since I had just made it. Looking back, it was a simple creation without a pattern. However, at that time, I felt it was quite well done, so I took it to the kimono shop I mentioned earlier. To my surprise, the older ladies who were customers there said things like, ‘Anyone who buys this must be pitiable,’ expressing several negative opinions. I was really upset and thought, ‘I will prove them wrong.

Q: It became one of the driving forces, didn't it? At this stage, were you creating them purely as a hobby, without any thoughts of selling?


Yes, I was making them as one of my hobbies. Later on, I happened to participate in a garage sale and sold my creations for the first time. Art students from an art university happened to be there and were delighted to purchase them. It brought me immense joy to see something I made being sold and recognized.

After that, as I gradually created more and shared them on Instagram, I received positive reactions from foreigners. Thinking, “Maybe this could work,” I sent them to friends living in France, New York, Canada, Thailand, and Korea, and asked for their opinions. The responses were vastly different from those of Japanese individuals. While Japanese people tend to view the pieces as “kimono patterns,” foreigners see them purely as “designs.” They appreciated the work without any preconceived notions.

Additionally, individuals with mixed Japanese heritage expressed happiness, saying that by carrying my bags, it became “a part of establishing their identity” and “having something Japanese made them proud.” When I heard this, I became convinced that my creations held value beyond just being bags.

Japanese kimono bag designer

Q:You noticed the value of your creations through the difference in reactions between Japan and overseas?

Yes, from this experience, I launched a brand to turn it into a business.

Therefore, I went to New York, where I had previously researched and found many foreigners selling kimonos.

Every day, carrying my most colorful self-made bag, I walked around New York. I approached people who seemed to like Japan, sent DMs to various individuals, and even participated in Japan festivals where Japan enthusiasts gathered.

Japanese kimono bag designer
Japanese kimono bag designer

Q: How did you feel about the differences between Japan and New York?

In Japan, although it might be different for the younger generation, there are generally strict rules surrounding kimonos. The patterns vary with the seasons, and there are many times when they cannot be worn. Due to the deeply rooted traditions, many people don’t view them as “fashion.”

However, I want to promote these patterns as “designs” and “fashion.” That’s why I had to go to America. In New York, I was able to prove the fact that they are accepted with an entirely different sensibility than in Japan.

Japanese kimono bag designer
Japanese kimono bag designer

Q:A strength is palpable within Akiko. What might be the reason for her deep fascination with the charm of kimonos?

Kimono is akin to wearing a “Japanese painting.” When you cut out a portion of its pattern, it is truly art in itself. I am captivated by kimonos in this way, and to make them more accessible as a fashion, I arrange them in a contemporary style and share them.

Many Japanese individuals often mention, ‘I don’t know how to coordinate it.’ When I talk to people, a lot of them express interest in kimonos, desiring to own one, but the fear of judgment from others acts as a significant barrier.Essentially, it boiled down to the idea that it’s “difficult to use because others aren’t using it.” However, foreigners tend to act based on what they personally desire rather than being concerned about how others perceive them. It’s as simple as “I find it cute, so I’ll use it.

Japanese kimono bag designer

Q:In that case, would the target audience be international customers?

When I share on social media, a significant number of interested individuals are foreigners, especially those from Western countries. Over the past two years, shuttling between New York and Japan, I have keenly felt the differences in reactions.

I want to shine where there is demand. In Japan, I received many negative comments. However, considering the drastic change when I shifted to New York, I believe the initial focus should be on expanding internationally.

Q:You are well-versed in matters abroad, and you have many friends living overseas. I am also impressed by your powerful ability to take immediate action.

Debuting overseas at the age of 8, my parents applied for a program organized by Shizuoka Prefecture. During spring break, we sailed to Saipan and Guam. Subsequently, in my first year of junior high, I participated in a student exchange program to Nepal with our sister school. In my second year, I went on a training trip to Hawaii. Through these experiences, I became aware of the differences between Japan and other countries from a young age.

Therefore, I had many questions about unique Japanese rules, such as “Why can’t you dye your hair?” “Why are piercings not allowed?” and “Is the discipline of seniors and juniors really necessary?”

Later, as a university student and working professional, I continued to travel between Japan and overseas, leveraging my experiences abroad. Whenever I go abroad, there is always a sense of excitement. The more I take action, the more acquaintances I make and connections I establish. When invited by locals, my response is an immediate “Yes!”—I act promptly.

Q: What do you think is the source of the power to take action without hesitation?

When you make decisions and take actions on your own, people around you naturally lend their support. The ability to act is made possible by the assistance of cooperative individuals. From an external perspective, it might seem like I’m doing everything alone, but it’s truly the support of those who agree with me that enables my actions.

Also, I have a rebellious spirit. In response to people who bring negative opinions, I want to show results and prove them wrong.

Q:Lastly, could you share your outlook for the future?

I would like to delve deeper into the world of kimono and materials (fabrics, etc.). While refining my sewing skills with the help of my adept aunt, who is skilled in dressmaking, I am eager to learn more.

Moreover, I aspire to emphasize the sense of uniqueness, such as the use of high-quality fabrics and threads and the creation of precious items through special weaving techniques. In addition to focusing on design for international audiences, I plan to incorporate the cherished traditional culture of the Japanese, ensuring that each pattern carries a meaningful story.

By showcasing aspects that may go unnoticed if confined to Japan, I hope to prove that they can shine when presented to a global audience. It would bring me great happiness to envision a future where the wonderful traditions and cultures I bring abroad contribute to a significant and widespread impact.

MEINFINITY Kimono Bag

Through the interview with Akiko this time, we learned about the importance of taking action and sticking to one’s concept.

 

For artists currently active as handmade creators in Japan who are considering expanding their activities overseas, I suggest visiting the actual locations, even if it involves combining it with market research or private travel. By going to the local area, you can observe who resides there, what types of designs are popular, and the price range of products being sold.

Although there may be a language barrier, using translation features on your mobile device to communicate with local shopkeepers could lead to new discoveries and valuable advice!

 

At niji, we have launched an online marketplace for artists who wish to sell their creations overseas.

If you are interested, please feel free to contact us.

 

Email : niji@japanese-artist-popupshop.com

Website

Instagram

Posted on

Japan Village Holiday Makers Market

Japan Village Holiday Makers Market

We are happy to announce that we will be hosting a Japanese Holiday Makers Market at Japan Village in Brooklyn in 2023!

About the event

Collaborating with Japan Village for the holiday market!

This time, the event will last for 9 days and will feature collaborations with more than 10 Japanese handmade artists. Handmade jewelry, apparel, ceramics, handbags, and more will be on sale. Please join us for holiday shopping at Japan Village!

Japanese handmade makers market

Date and Location

📍 Location: : Japan Village

934 3rd Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11232

📅 Date : Dec 16th(Sat)-24th(Sun) 

⏰ Time:

12/16(Sat)12-8PM

12/17(Sun)-12/22(Fri) 12-6PM

12/23(Sat)12-7PM

12/24(Sun)12-3PM

 

Meet our Japanese handmade artists!

kazaria3

Handmade reversible bucket hat with Javanese fabric.

Japanese reversible bucket hat
Japanese reversible bucket hat
Kimono robe
Japanese Handmade Hat designer

Pucci Ropa Jewelry

Handmade starling silver/brass jewelry. Made with special tool that creates organic and abstract shape. Enjoy a unique jewelry and hidden massages.

 

Interview article of pucci ropa jewelry

 

Japanese Jewelry designer
Japanese silver jewelry designer
Japanese silver jewelry designer
Japanese silver jewelry designer

satokomatsu

Designed with elegant curves of Japanese “Hiragana” letters, this pendant showcases the word らんぷ (lan-pu), meaning “lamp.” What would you wish for if a genie were to grant your desires? This pendant invites you to create your own wishes come true.

Interview article of satokomatsu

Online Store

hiragana jewelry
Japanese jewelry designer
Camel and sakura shape handmade necklace

JOGI NO YUME

We introduce Japan imported handmade earrings and handmade jewelry (bracelet and earrings) with supplies from Japan to all the New Yorke. We aimed to introduce high quality hypoallergenic earrings from Japan that we both loved and would like to share the joy with New York jewelry lover.

handmade jewelry
handmade jewelry
handmade jewelry
handmade jewelry

SumiYuri Studio

Rugs, stationary, textile art

Yayoi Filipski handmade rug
Yayoi Filipski handmade rug
Yayoi Filipski handmade rug
Yayoi Filipski handmade rug

Riverside Wrapping Co.

Riverside Wrapping Co. offers high quality custom gift wrapping service and Mizuhiki (Japanese paper cords) accesories by certified Gift Wrapping Coordinator Emi, based in Upper West Side, NY.

mizuhiki artist
mizuhiki earring
Japanese Mizuhiki Earring
Handmade mizuhiki earrings

Ayumi Nojiri

I make ceramic tableware and flower vases. I like white-color ceramics, so most of my works are coated with a white glaze. More recently, I have created more pieces with pale green patterns on a white background as well as black pieces. Because ceramics can be easily customized by selecting combinations of various clays and glazes, we can generate handmade ceramics based on our inspiration. I also create pieces in a variety of colors and shapes according to my customers’ requests.

Ayumi Nojiri Interview article

Online Store

Ayumi Nojiri Handmade Ceramics
ayuminojiri
Ayumi Nojiri Handmade Ceramics
Ayumi Nojiri Handmade Ceramics

Lunaris

Hand crafted from start to finish. Lunaris Jewelry by NYC based Japanese designer Airi Nishiguchi captures the purity and effervescence of the moment you see a rainbow or a full moon. With dozens of designs available in Sterling Silver, Brass and 14k gold as well as comissioned pieces, you can bring a bit of charm and delight to your look.

Lunaris Japanese jewelry designer
Lunaris Japanese jewelry designer
Lunaris Japanese jewelry designer
Lunaris Japanese jewelry designer

MEINFINITY

The fabrics have unique designs of such quality that you feel as if you are wearing Japanese artwork. These bags are for anyone who would like to have unique designs based on Japanese culture. By owning your own Japanese bag, you can always have a piece of Japanese culture with you.

 

Online Store

MEINFINITY Kimono Bag
MEINFINITY Kimono Bag
MEINFINITY Kimono Bag

Pompkins Baby by Nappel

Pop Up Sox are made by Japanese craftsmen using special knitting machines that create the 3-D animal ears and hands that pop out– babies love them and so do grown-ups!

They are ideal baby shower gifts. Pompkins Baby organic cotton products have a natural and gentle feel. They are made from cotton that is grown in soil not treated with pesticides or chemical fertilizers for more than three years– ladybugs are used instead of pesticides, and is harvested after the frost has ended when leaves fall off naturally.

baby socks brand Nappel
baby socks Nappel
baby socks Nappel
baby socks Nappel

chocolateclayyy

Handmade jewelry from UV resin and polymer clay

Japanese Sakura earring
Japanese Sakura earring
Japanese Sakura earring
Japanese Sakura earring

We look forward to seeing you at the market!

We hope you’ll enjoy holiday shopping with us and find your favorite gift from our talented Japanese handmade artists.

 

If you are not based in NY, don’t worry; we have an online marketplace where you can find handmade gifts.
You can check our online store from here!

Japanklyn

A streetwear brand for all Japan lovers.

Japanklyn
Japanklyn

Riverside Wrapping Co.

I handmade earrings and small accessories with Japanese paper cords and also carry handmade greeting cards from Tokyo.

Mizuhiki accessory
Mizuhiki accessory
Mizuhiki accessory
Mizuhiki accessory

dankoartworks

Hand made ceramic pieces inspired by Japanese nature harmony

Hand made ceramic pieces
Hand made ceramic pieces
Posted on

Japanese Traditional Textiles

Japanese textiles

Learn about Japanese textiles

Textiles are fabrics made by crossing warp and weft yarns.

Japanese textiles are a very profound craft, handmade one by one by craftsmen using traditional methods handed down from generation to generation.

Japanese textiles|History, production methods, and areas

Japanese textiles have a long history.

Since its birth in ancient times, its manufacturing methods have been handed down from generation to generation and have repeatedly developed in unique ways in various regions.

History of Textiles

The origin of Japanese textiles is not clearly known but weaving tools have been found at ruins from the late Jomon to Yayoi periods. However, it is believed that textiles already existed before that time.

At this time, textiles were mainly made from plants such as hemp, fabrics made of silk would have been exceptionally rare.

In the Nara period (710-794), more advanced weaving techniques were introduced from China, and high-quality silk fabrics began to be produced. However, these were worn only by a few upper-class people, and the common people mainly wore hemp fabrics.

Silk fabrics continued to evolve with the times, and by the Edo period (1603-1867), silk fabrics were being developed in various regions of Japan.

Since silk fabrics were produced all over the country, even warriors and wealthy merchants other than the upper class came to wear silk fabrics.

However, in order to prevent the value of silk from falling, the common people were forbidden to wear it, and they ended up wearing hemp or cotton garments.

Textile Manufacturing Methods

Textile production methods spread throughout Japan, and manufacturing processes changed to suit the climate and culture of each region. Here, we first explain the manufacturing methods used for textiles in Japan.

Tsumugi

Tsumugi is a fabric made of silk or cotton.

It became popular in the Edo period (1603-1867) and gradually came to be treated as a luxury item. It is characterized by its strong durability.

Famous textile: Oshima tsumugi

100% silk. This textile is made mainly on Amami Oshima Island in Kagoshima Prefecture and is one of the world’s three major textiles. It is said to take six months to a year to make one piece, and it is said to be durable for 150 to 200 years even when worn as daily wear.

Kasuri

Kasuri is a textile made from yarn dyed in two or more different colors. There are a number of techniques related to textile patterns, but kasuri is characterized by the partial dye-proofing treatment applied to the threads before weaving to create a unique blurred appearance.

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Famous textile: Kurume Kasuri

One of the three major kasuri fabrics in Japan. This textile has a long history dating back to the Edo period. The works produced by skilled craftsmen have many fans and are now used for items familiar to us in our daily lives other than kimonos.

Nishiki

Nishiki is a general term for silk fabrics woven with two or more colors of threads. It has been hand-woven using looms that were introduced to Japan from China at least 1,200 years ago. It has been considered luxurious since ancient times and is characterized by gorgeous patterns.

Famous textile: Nishijin-ori

Nishijin-ori is the general term for a traditional weaving technique practiced mainly in Kyoto (especially in the Nishijin area).

It uses multi-colored threads to create beautiful patterns.

Textile production area

There are 38 types of textiles designated as “traditional crafts” by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry.

All of them are well-known textiles, and all of them are made by methods that make the most of their regional characteristics and are comparable to each other. The following is an excerpt of some of them.

  • Yuki-tsumugi (Ibaraki and Tochigi Prefectures)
  • Kihachijo (Tokyo)
  • Hakataori (Fukuoka Prefecture)
  • Kumejima Tsumugi (Okinawa Prefecture)
  • Oumi-jofu (Shiga Prefecture)
  • Yumihama Kasuri (Shimane)
  • Shiozawa Tsumugi (Niigata)
  • Ushikubi Tsumugi (Ishikawa)

and 30 other types (in no particular order)

Items made of Japanese textiles

The most typical example is the kimono.

It could be said that the kimono culture has encouraged the development of textile culture.

Kimonos and obis are the culmination of all textile techniques, and there are kimono museums in Tokyo, Fukushima Prefecture, and Kyoto Prefecture.

In addition to kimonos, you can make all kinds of daily necessities out of cloth.

 

  • Clothing (kimonos, clothes, ties, hats, etc.)
  • Accessories (hair ornaments, earrings, etc.)
  • Ornaments (fabric for dolls and tapestry, etc.)
  • Small and miscellaneous goods (curtains, wallets, pen cases, coasters, cushions, etc.)

Japanese Kimono Culture

As mentioned above, the kimono is the most representative textile-based item.

During the Edo period, almost all Japanese citizens wore kimonos.

Unfortunately, however, it is rare to see people wearing kimonos in general in modern Japan.

In modern Japan, if you walk down the street wearing a kimono, people will think it is a hobby, an event, or that you are a rich person, etc. It is unlikely that you will be thought to be wearing it on a daily basis as everyday wear.

 

There is no definitive record of when the kimono culture died out and when ordinary Japanese began to wear western-style clothing, but it seems to have gradually disappeared from their living environment about 100 years ago due to the flow of western culture and the convenience of western clothing.

For women who are now in their 70s or older, it was a kind of custom when they were young to wear a well-tailored kimono as their wedding garment.

So, after grandmothers pass away, many kimonos are often found in the paulownia-wood chests that were used to store kimonos.

Unfortunately, grandchildren would never have a chance to wear them, so there is often little choice but to dispose of them or sell them to a vendor.

However, expensive kimonos and kimonos that we have a special attachment to are the ones we would like to keep.

The trouble with kimonos is that they take up a lot of space and are difficult to preserve.

In particular, expensive kimonos are made of silk, and silk kimonos are easily eaten by insects and quickly damaged. For this reason, one popular craft idea is to remake just a portion of the kimono and turn it into a purse, hair ornament, etc.

New Crafts Created from Old Kimonos

There is an attempt to remake kimono that are no longer worn or have holes in them and bring them to the world as new products.

Kimono patterns have traditional and uniquely Japanese stylistic beauty and are of interest to people overseas as well.

 

 

  • Cartonnage
  • Tablecloths
  • Patchwork
  • Cushion covers
  • Pierced earrings
  • Buttons
  • Tapestry
  • Hairpin materials

and many other items

 

Kimono-patterned accessories are often displayed at handmade markets around Japan. If you are interested, please stop by.

Summary

Each hand-woven textile is the culmination of a craftsman’s skills, and just by looking at such textiles, you can feel as if you have been touched by a powerful art form.

Weaving requires skills and specialized tools, and it is difficult for an amateur to start weaving from scratch in a workshop.

However, kimono remakes are easy to start even for beginners.

I dream that Japanese textiles will be seen by many people around the world

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Japanese Traditional Crafts|ORIGAMI

Japanese Origami Paper

Origami is one of the traditional handicrafts that are widely popular among the general public.

Origami is a handicraft that requires no tools, skills, or space, and can be played with whenever the mood strikes.

In this article, we will explain the history of origami and how it is actually folded.

Origami|from generation to generation

For Japanese people, origami is something they are very familiar with, used for play at home and in preschools or kindergartens.

First, I’ll summarize the basics of origami, from its history to the different types of folding techniques.

A History of Origami

In the early 7th century, paper manufacturing methods were introduced to Japan from mainland China, and Japanese people’s ingenuity gave birth to washi, a thin and durable paper.

Washi was an important item for sutra copying and record keeping, but eventually “ceremonial origami” was created to accompany gifts and other items, and “playful origami” was created for the purpose of playing.

A kind of Origami Paper

Origami can be made on basically any paper.

The most used shape is the square, but there are also origami papers folded in other shapes such as rectangles and triangles.

The most famous origami pattern is chiyogami.

Chiyogami is paper printed with traditional Japanese patterns such as hemp leaves and deer.

Some people may associate chiyogami with origami cranes, as it is the paper often used to fold origami cranes.

 

Folding Types

Origami has several fixed ways of folding.

Fusetsu Seihokei Ichimai ori | One square paper type

It’s read, “Fusetsu (No cutting) Seihokei (Square) Ichimai (one piece of paper) ori (fold).

This is a folding method using only one square sheet of paper, without using scissors.

This is the basic type of origami, and some people prefer it.

Fukugo-ori |Compound type

A folding method that first folds several parts separately and finally combines them into a single piece. A traditional example is the combination of “yakko-san” and “hakama”.

By joining separately folded parts together, it is relatively easy to create complex shapes without cutting into the paper.

In some cases, glue or staples are used to join the parts together.

Kirikomi Ori | Add notching type

This is a folding method that makes it easier to fold complicated shapes by making cuts in the paper to increase the number of corners or by cutting out a portion of the paper. Some origami enthusiasts have negative opinions about this method because it is not a straightforward method, such as using scissors.

Shikake Ori | Trick type

A toy that can be moved. There are old examples such as “camera” (the shutter opens) and “flapping bird” (you can move its wings by holding its neck and tail).

These are popular for playing with children because they attract their interest.

Advantages of Origami

There are many advantages to playing with origami.

Here are just a few examples

 

Can be done anywhere

Easy to take with you when you go out

 

Costs very little

The only cost is for paper

 

Can be played by both men and women

Physical differences are not a handicap

 

No need for scissors, staples, or glue

No need to use extra items

 

Encourages conversation with parents, children and grandchildren

Helps develop imagination

 

There are countless variations of how to fold

You can discover new things to fold, depending on your ideas

Classic Origami Folds

Crane is the most famous origami among all the origami.

This is because Japan has a tradition called “Senbazuru,” which means “a thousand cranes made of origami. This is said to have become Senbazuru as a lucky number from the phrase “a crane is a thousand years.” It is said that classmates, friends, and acquaintances fold origami cranes and give them to patients who are hospitalized for illness, etc., as a message to pray for their health recovery.

Armor worn on the head in battle. In Japan, helmets first appeared in the Kofun period.

The helmets worn by those in command in particular were unique to each army, and some of their designs are still talked about today.

The original function of the helmet was to protect the head, of course, but warlords attached unique tatemono (ornaments) to their helmets in order to stand out on the battlefield and show their dignity and status by wearing a glittering helmet.

When I was a child, I used to fold letters between friends in this slightly unusual way.

When I folded them this way, my parents couldn’t see them…. My parents could not read it secretly because they could not re-fold it (since they did not know how to fold it).

There are many simple and cute shapes like this. The “balloon” is a simple and cute shape that can be folded in a very simple way.

This is a type of origami that can be folded and played with, rather than folded and displayed.

Like a balloon, it can be blown up by blowing into it, so you can play with it by bouncing it with your hand or throwing it.

Children may be pleased if you use a large piece of paper to make it.

This is one of the trick folds as well. When you hold down the bottom part, it bounces like a frog. It is made of paper, so it is safe for babies to hold.

You can make several and have a race with your friends.

Shuriken origami is also popular.

You can actually throw them or combine different colors to make colorful shurikens.

The shapes are also interesting and can be used for art and other purposes.

 

There are many more origami videos on YouTube.

The ideas are varied.

Please enjoy crafts using your favorite patterns and papers.

Summary

Origami is an excellent handicraft that is low in cost and can be played with by children and adults alike.

We hope that this article will help spread the joy of origami to more families with children who are just learning to play with their hands, as well as to relatives’ gatherings and classrooms.

We have a wonderful seller who creates beautiful origami earrings.

Please check out our online store below.

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Interview with Japanese ceramic artist Ayumi Nojiri

Ayumi Nojiri

We interviewed Ayumi Nojiri, a New York-based ceramic artist who participated in the handmade POP-UP event sponsored by niji. We asked her about her brand, works, and future plans.

ayuminojiri

Q/ You crafted many handmade pieces with gentle curves. Please first tell us a little about your brand.

I make ceramic tableware and flower vases. I like white-color ceramics, so most of my works are coated with a white glaze. More recently, I have created more pieces with pale green patterns on a white background as well as black pieces. Because ceramics can be easily customized by selecting combinations of various clays and glazes, we can generate handmade ceramics based on our inspiration. I also create pieces in a variety of colors and shapes according to my customers’ requests.

 

My works are mainly sold at flower shops and artwork stores in and around New York City. I also receive custom orders for tableware from restaurants. My designs have been well received by my customers as they go well with food and flowers. My works are also sold on a consignment basis through ceramics shops and events. The mugs are especially popular these days.

 

Q/ What made you start creating ceramics?

I’m originally from Osaka, Japan, and grew up watching my parents who had worked in the fashion industry. I loved sewing, crafting, and cooking even in my childhood. Retrospectively, I think my parents with creative jobs had significant influences on my artistic interests. No matter what, I really loved crafting handmade items.

After graduating from a university in Japan, I worked at an advertising firm for about a year. However, my health gradually deteriorated in trying to manage the intense workload; I eventually had to quit the job. While thinking about my future career and life, I was inspired by my mother, who worked globally as a fashion designer. Eventually, I decided to move to the United States. I did not have a detailed plan on what to do after coming to the United States, but I wanted to see overseas and test my abilities. I chose New York as my destination, as it is a city with many artists. I was 24 years old at the time.

One day, a while after I came to New York, an idea to make some ceramics suddenly emerged. I decided to attend the local ceramics classes in New York run by a Japanese owner. There was no particular reason or plan for this either; it just came to me one day. It was a pretty similar situation in which people think, “Maybe I should start going to the gym.” In those classes, I learned about ceramics from scratch. I had no knowledge and experience of ceramics whatsoever until then.

A few years after I started joining the classes, the owner asked me if I was interested in becoming an instructor for the same classes. I accepted the offer and started teaching. I had been teaching for about three or four years, but due to the pandemic, the class operations were temporarily suspended. On top, my two daughters were young back then. Those conditions made me put my teaching job on hold. However, I continued my crafting activities while my children were asleep or when they were at school.

Meanwhile, through my friends and personal network, I started to get several offers to sell my ceramic pieces to flower shops and restaurants or on consignment. There was a time when I was proactively marketing my products myself, but thanks to everyone’s support, I was able to rapidly develop a sales network.

Ayumi Nojiri

Q/There are many different types of art, but why did you choose ceramics? Tell us what is the unique nature of ceramics that has attracted you.

The great thing about ceramics is that everyone from children to adults can enjoy making pieces. Ceramics are enjoyed all over the world, regardless of country or culture. It is very attractive that we can freely create ceramics with our own hands from soft clay and we can use our works in our daily lives. While teaching the ceramic classes, I loved seeing students of various ages and levels have a lot of fun making their handmade pieces. 

 

Since I have two young daughters, it can be difficult to work as an artist while raising children. But recently, my daughters have expressed interest in making ceramics. We sometimes make some pieces together. Every time I see my daughters passionately working on their creations, I feel like I have returned to my early years as an artist and experienced the joy of ceramics all over again.

 

There are many steps involved in making ceramics, and it takes time and effort to complete a single piece. Just because you put in a lot of time and effort doesn’t mean you’ll end up with a wonderful piece. Many works just do not meet my initial expectations. However, if it is before firing, pieces are recyclable  so we can recreate something  new from scratch. Ceramics is an art field with a lot of freedom. I am noticing that more and more young generations in the United States are becoming interested in ceramics.

Ayumi Nojiri

Q/ How did you come across the “Japanese Artist Pop-up Shop?” What was it like joining the event, and what do you find appealing about it from an artist’s perspective?

I met the organizer of the Japanese Artist Pop-up Shop at one event; that’s how I was invited to the pop-up shop. Although I have participated in many events, I got the impression that the Japanese Artist Pop-up Shop was exceptionally well taken care of by the organizer. Since every detail was carefully planned, I was able to participate smoothly with peace of mind as an artist. I recommend other artists consider joining the event too.

I also liked the fact that the event was held in the East Village, Manhattan. My works are not particularly inspired by Japanese culture, but the area has many Japanese restaurants and is always busy with local New Yorkers who are interested in Japanese culture. During the event, I received many questions from customers regarding my work. Some American customers had knowledge of traditional Japanese porcelain, such as Arita ware, and I was able to feel firsthand that Japanese culture is widely loved in the United States.

Q/ What is your outlook for the future?

I have a plan to teach ceramics classes at an art studio, which is scheduled to open in 2024. While I like making pieces myself, I also want people to know the joy of making ceramics. Thus, I am really looking forward to teaching the classes. Also, because the owner of the new studio has a Korean heritage, it would be great if we could mix the best parts of Korean and Japanese ceramics to create new, unique pieces.

Additionally, I plan to arrange more collaborations with tattoo artists. My husband also owns an art brand and designs and sells products by working together with various artists. Through the process, I have developed friendships with tattoo artists. Those artists once added tattoo-themed illustrations to my ceramic pieces and we sold them as a joint work. I would like to organize more of those collaborative projects in the future. Through their tattoo illustrations, we may be able to craft works with more Japanese tastes. 

Ayumi Nojiri

If you’re interested in learning more about Ayumi Nojiri’s work, please check out her Instagram.

Check out the following website for the future schedule of the Handmade Makers Market organized by niji: WebsiteYou can also purchase handmade pieces crafted by Japanese artists online: Online Store

 

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Let’s Celebrate World Sake Day : Handmade Craft, Sake & Japanese Cuisine Event

world sake day

What's World Sake Day?

World Sake Day is an annual celebration dedicated to the traditional Japanese rice wine known as sake. Sake enthusiasts around the world come together every October 1st to honor the rich history and cultural significance of this beloved beverage. The event used to be regarded as only a national event in Japan. October 1 is traditionally the starting date of sake production in the country.

About the event

Collaborating with Upstairs NYC and MIKA to celebrate World Sake Day!

Join us in experiencing Japanese culture and discovering delicious crafted Japanese sake and authentic cuisine. We will also have talented Japanese artisans with us. Please join us to meet these artists in person!

world sake day

What can I expect at the event

We have Japanese handmade artists at the event, and you can also experience Japanese craft sake tasting. Additionally, there will be Japanese food vendors at the event. Please come and enjoy Friday night with us!

 

Location : Union Square

31E 17th St, 2nd Floor New York NY (Entrance is on 17th Street)

Date

October 13th (Fri) 17:00-21:00

◇Ticket

  • Early Bird $35
  • Regular Ticket $45

*Ticket will be available for purchase at the door!

The ticket include 10 kinds of sake tasting + Original Sake glass

 

**We check ID at the entrance. Attendees 21 years of age or older will be provided wristband at the check-in, please wear the wristband while you attend the event, we only provide alcohol drinks to the guests who wears the wristband.

Meet our Japanese handmade artists!

We would like to introduce our artists and Japanese artisan food vendors.

Riverside Wrapping Co.

I handmade earrings and small accessories with Japanese paper cords and also carry handmade greeting cards from Tokyo.

 

mizuhiki artist
mizuhiki earring

Malpha

Hi! My name is Maiko. 

I am the owner and founder of Malpha Jewelry. My New York City life experiences have empowered and redefined how I view self awareness, self-love, being enough, and its value to genuine beauty. I created my first earring to represent my decision and commitment to love & value myself, in putting my needs first. Valuing self-love has made me a better person to the world. I became a jewelry designer to recreate that feeling of empowerment & beauty in others when they wear Malpha jewelry. My desire is to reach every person who needs a one of a kind positive charm to remind them that they are beautiful & good enough where they are.

 

handmade jewelry
Malpha

MISOMARU

A ‘Miso Soup Bomb,’ which allows you to easily make delicious miso soup, will be available for purchase at the event. You can also try a tasting at their booth.

Miso bomb

satokomatsu

Handcrafted in the Bronx, our jewelry fuses Japanese Hiragana and Arabic with a concept that ‘Jewelry can connect people.

satokomatsu
sake necklace

Her interview article is available here. You can also purchase her items on our online marketplace “niji”.

Pucci Ropa Jewelry

Handmade starling silver/brass jewelry. 

Made with special tool that creates organic and abstract shape. Enjoy a unique jewelry and hidden massages. ~chihiro takeshita~
 I put my idea that comes from my experiences, feelings and favorite things into my design. 
Each shapes and designes are slightly different each other as you are. Same meanings, but from different aspect.
I want people to feel the energy through the jewelry.

silver handmade jewelry
silver handmade ring

Her interview article is available here.

MIYOMACCHI

Discover MIYOMACCHI: Born 8/8/2023 in Manhattan’s East Village. We’re all about cat-themed sweets & top-tier pastries that taste as good as they look. Quality is our jam – premium ingredients & killer flavors.

Cat shape sweets

Japanklyn

A streetwear brand for all Japan lovers

Japanklyn
Japanklyn

organic art reiki candles

Organic handmade natural candles one by one by channeling artist and healing cellist Chi . No chemical , no artificial color and made in NYC . her candles are added reiki clearing energy as well . Her candles are not only art but also healing and eye – candies . When she makes them , she puts full of love n wish your happiness as well .

Organic handmade candle

Elly’s pastry

In 2022, our small patisserie opened in NYC in collaboration with Tazue Inc. Our head chef, Elly, was born and raised in Japan. Elly has over 20 years of experience as pasty chef working in both Tokyo and New York. 

Japanese fruits sandwich

What kind of Japanese craft sake will be included in the sake tasting?

Special Sake Selection: 30+ Selections, 17+ Brands !

Learn more about each brand below. If you’re interested in Japanese sake, don’t miss the opportunity to meet Sake specialists from the sake vendors at the event and gain valuable knowledge.

sake brands

Kubota Sake

@kubota_sake_global : KUBOTA:“Tanrei-karakuchi”- crisp, clean and dry sake brewed in Nagaoka, Niigata. Introducing ways to enjoy our versatile drink.

kubota sake

Takara Shuzo

@takarasakeusa @miosparklingusa : Since launching sake brewing operations in 1842, in the late Edo period, Takara Shuzo have been providing for more than 170 years a wide variety of products underpinned by thier creative and proven technology responding to the values and tastes of consumers.

takarashuzo

KIKUSUI

@kikusui_pr : 【Numerous Gold Prizes in Japan】

Kikusui has been awarded many gold prizes for its new-brew Sake in some of Japan’s most authoritative competitions, which judge the quality of new Sake produced in breweries throughout Japan.

KATO SAKE WORKS

@katosakeworks : Kato Sake Works is a local craft sake brewery in Bushwick Brooklyn, featured on New York Times, Kato Sake Works offers local sake enjoyed genuinely.

Katosake

WESAKE

@drinkwesake 

WESAKE is a sake brand that offers smooth, crisp, and easy-to-drink sake perfected by tradition, for everyone to enjoy. Crafted in Kobe, Japan, with rice, water, koji, and yeast, WESAKE is the perfect choice for any occasion and palate.

we sake

KIENOENE

@kinoene_sake

https://www.mtcsake.com/sake-2/kinoene-akiagari-junmai-ginjo

www.iinumahonke.co.jp

【Gold Prizes Japan】

Kinoene has been making sake in Chiba Japan for 300 years, combining tradition and art with technology. Kinoene Masamune participates in the community as well by contricuting to tourisum, and develop & sells confections and sake-related goods to enrich local culture adn commerce.

Ticket

  • Early Bird $35
  • Regular Ticket $45

The ticket include 10 kinds of sake tasting + Original Sake glass

**We check ID at the entrance. Attendees 21 years of age or older will be provided wristband at the check-in, please wear the wristband while you attend the event, we only provide alcohol drinks to the guests who wears the wristband.

FAQ

  • Will tickets also be sold at the door?
    Yes, if it has not been sold out and while supplies last.
  • How does check-in work?
    We’ll scan in your QR code at the venue, and give you a glass and drink voucher.
  • What if I lose the drink voucher and glass?
    Do not lose your food & drink voucher. We’re unable to replace these if you lose them. Use it or lose it 😉

Refund Policy

REFUND POLICY
The event fee is non-refundable. You can, on the other hand, transfer a ticket to a friend.

If an event is postponed, rescheduled, or moved, your tickets are still valid for the new date and no further action is required. Emails will be sent to ticket holders notifying them of any available refund options for the event.

Gallery

Japanese jewelry designer
Japanklyn